the picture angle | something for the pixel peepers…
Subscribe
RSS
Archive
January February March April May June July August September October November December (1)
January February March (2) April (1) May June July (1) August September (2) October November December
January February March April May June July August September (1) October (6) November (2) December
January (1) February (1) March (2) April May June July August (2) September (1) October November December
January February March April (1) May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December

something for the pixel peepers…

March 22, 2014  •  Leave a Comment

I always wondered what pixel peeping was all about. After my recent purchase of and experience with the Fuji X-Pro 1, I wanted to see for myself after marvelling at the resolution of the sensor. So I hung my lovely vintage style silk blouse with embroidery (great for texture and fine detail) on the front room door and took a series of pictures from about 60 cm away. The ISO was set to 2000, and the images were taken under available daylight, with AWB and aperture priority, and converted to jpg in Aperture without any processing.

Click to view slideshow.

For a closer look, please follow this link:

fujinon 35mm f/1.4

Then I thought: why not make a comparison? So I exchanged the Fuji X-Pro 1 for the Olympus OM-D E-M5 with the Panasonic Leica 25mm f/1.4 and did the same series with the same settings.

Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 25mm f/1.4

And while I was at it, I swapped the lovely Panasonic Leica Summilux for the delightful Voigtländer Nokton M43 25mm and did the same series again, plus one image at the fabled f/0.95 aperture.

Voigtländer Nokton M43 25mm f/0.95

Happy peeping!

(edited) One surprising finding of this exercise for me was not so much the way both cameras rendered the colour differently (they are different sensors, after all)  but how one and the same camera did the same for the two lenses that I used.

Interesting is also that the Fuji set and the Olympus with Nokton set are closer to each other in terms of colour than either is to the Olympus with Lumix lens set. They also both appear truer to life than the Lumix lens shots. Possibly down to the fact that the Nokton is fully manual and doesn’t electronically communicate with the camera at all? (edited)



Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...